Why Privacy Matters

Why Privacy Matters - design and internet

Why Privacy Matters – Glenn Greenwald was one of the first reporters to see – and write about – the Edward Snowden files, with their revelations about the United States’ extensive surveillance of private citizens.

In this searing talk, Greenwald makes the case for why you need to care about privacy, even if you’re “not doing anything you need to hide.”

Privacy is foundational to who we are as human beings, and every day it helps us define our relationships with the outside world.

It gives us space to be free of judgement and allows us to think freely without discrimination. It gives us the freedom of autonomy, and to live in dignity.

Privacy has become all the more essential in the age of data exploitation.

The way data and technology are now deployed means that our privacy is under increased threat and on a scale that we couldn’t have imagined 20 years ago, outside of science fiction – the ways in which we can be tracked and identified have exploded, alongside the types and scale of information available about us.

When something is private to a person, it usually means that something is inherently special or sensitive to them. The domain of privacy partially overlaps with security, which can include the concepts of appropriate use and protection of information.

Privacy may also take the form of bodily integrity. The right not to be subjected to unsanctioned invasions of privacy by the government, corporations, or individuals is part of many countries’ privacy laws, and in some cases, constitutions.

Credit: Why Privacy Matters | Transcript | Watch on TED

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